Bilde av Kongstorp, Mette
Bilde av Kongstorp, Mette
Translasjonell nevrovitenskap og atferd mette.kongstorp@uit.no Tromsø

Mette Kongstorp


Postdoctoral fellow

Stillingsbeskrivelse

Postodoctoral research fellow in Behavioral Neuroscience 


  • Mette Kongstorp, Inger Lise Bogen, Tom Stiris, Jannike Mørch Andersen :
    Prenatal exposure to methadone or buprenorphine impairs cognitive performance in young adult rats
    Drug and Alcohol Dependence 2020 ARKIV / DOI
  • Mette Kongstorp, Inger Lise Bogen, Synne Steinsland, Elisabeth Nerem, Triske Woshyar Salih, Tom Stiris m.fl.:
    Prenatal exposure to methadone or buprenorphine alters µ-opioid receptor binding and downstream signaling in the rat brain
    International Journal of Developmental Neuroscience 2020 ARKIV / DOI
  • Mette Kongstorp, Tiril Schjølberg, Daniel Pitz Jacobsen, Fred Haugen, Johannes Gjerstad :
    Epiregulin is released from intervertebral disks and induces spontaneous activity in pain pathways
    Pain 2019 DOI
  • Mette Kongstorp, Inger Lise Bogen, Tom Stiris, Jannike Mørch Andersen :
    High accumulation of methadone compared with buprenorphine in fetal rat brain after maternal exposure
    Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics 2019 DOI
  • Marthe Fredheim Fjelldal, Mussie Ghezu Hadera, Mette Kongstorp, Lars Peter Engeset Austdal, Ana Sulovic, Jannike Mørch Andersen :
    Opioid receptor-mediated changes in the NMDA receptor in developing rat and chicken
    International Journal of Developmental Neuroscience 2019 DOI
  • Mette Kongstorp, James Edgar McCutcheon :
    Protein restriction alters cue-evoked licking behavior in head-fixed mice
    2022

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    Forskningsinteresser

    Our research is focused on how the brain controls appetite and our food choices. Ensuring appropriate intake of the three macronutrients, carbohydrate, fat, and protein, is a compelling problem for survival of all animals, including humans. Of these, protein is believed to be the most essential, as many amino acids cannot be synthesized de novo. Accordingly, animals adjust their behavior to ensure adequate intake of dietary protein for survival. Animals that are maintained on a protein-restricted diet develop a strong preference for a protein-rich solution, relative to carbohydrate-rich solution. However, much is still unknown about the neuronal mechanisms orchestrating this behavior. In my research, we study the neuronal activity from specific subpopulations of lateral hypothalamus neurons in response to food that contains protein during protein appetite by use of mulitphoton microscopy.