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spring 2020

SPL-3005 Comprehensive Planning and democracy - 10 ECTS

Sist endret: 09.07.2020

The course is provided by

Faculty of Humanities, Social Sciences and Education

Location

Tromsø |

Application deadline

Applicants from Nordic countries: 1 June for the autumn semester and 1 December for the spring semester. Applicants from outside the Nordic countries: 1 October for the spring semester and 15 April for the autumn semester.

Type of course

The course may be taken as a single course.

Admission requirements

Bachelor degree in social sciences is required as a general rule.  The minimum average grade requirement is: C - for bachelor's degree or equivalent issued in Europe, Canada, USA, Australia and New Zealand B - for bachelor's degree or equivalent issued in all other countries

The course is open for students accepted in master's degree programmes in other social science disciplines.

Application code: 9371.

Course content

Traditionally, planning was regarded as a form of societal guidance based on expertise. Today, however, public planning in liberal democracies such as the Nordic countries, is firmly anchored in democratic principles. The democratic character of both the processes and content of planning, is nonetheless challenged by various developments. In this course, the students will engage with contributions within planning theory that address this complexity, while acknowledging that no single planning paradigm dominates the field.

 

Public planning cannot be understood as the mere application of technically rational and value-free knowledge based on idealized science, but is interwoven in formal and informal processes of politics and power. As a result, planning theory has turned its attention to planning as a form of governance, or as an arena for the playing out of conflicting interests. This connects planning to different institutional spheres and centres of gravity, but also presents opportunities for communicative interaction and the intersubjective creation of shared meanings.

A common thread within current planning theories, is an emphasis on action and planning practice, and the question of reflexivity is central. Planning has developed and gained legitimacy as a problem-solving activity, but this legitimacy has been challenged, and we find ourselves in a more fragmented situation. At the same time, coordinated and cohesive strategies and solutions cutting across disciplines, sectors and fields of action are in no way less needed.Traditionally, planning was regarded as a form of societal guidance based on expertise. Today, however, public planning in liberal democracies such as the Nordic countries, is firmly anchored in democratic principles. The democratic character of both the processes and content of planning, is nonetheless challenged by various developments. In this course, the students will engage with contributions within planning theory that address this complexity, while acknowledging that no single planning paradigm dominates the field.

 

Public planning cannot be understood as the mere application of technically rational and value-free knowledge based on idealized science, but is interwoven in formal and informal processes of politics and power. As a result, planning theory has turned its attention to planning as a form of governance, or as an arena for the playing out of conflicting interests. This connects planning to different institutional spheres and centres of gravity, but also presents opportunities for communicative interaction and the intersubjective creation of shared meanings.

A common thread within current planning theories, is an emphasis on action and planning practice, and the question of reflexivity is central. Planning has developed and gained legitimacy as a problem-solving activity, but this legitimacy has been challenged, and we find ourselves in a more fragmented situation. At the same time, coordinated and cohesive strategies and solutions cutting across disciplines, sectors and fields of action are in no way less needed.

Objectives of the course

The students have the following learning outcomes:

 

Knowledge

The student has:

  • A thorough, solution-oriented understanding of the dilemmas arising from the tensions between professional knowledge and democratic processes in planning.
  • Knowledge of different understandings of democracy, and the ability to relate this knowledge to planning approaches and traditions

 

 

Skills

The student is able to / can:

  • Analyse the democratic aspects of actual plans and planning processes through being able to uncover and reflect on mechanisms of exclusion and pre-emptive issue definitions and agenda setting.

 

Competence

The student will be able to:

Use theoretical concepts to illuminate and discuss how various forms of planning actualize democratic dilemmas and potentials.

Language of instruction

English.

Teaching methods

Ten double lectures and ten one-hour seminars, plus a one-day conference organised by the students.

All courses will be evaluated once during the period of the study program. The board of the program decides which courses will be evaluated by students and teacher each year.

Assessment

The following coursework requirements must be completed and approved in order to take the final exam:

Mandatory attendance at 75% of lessons. Presentation of article at seminar.

The exam will consist of:

 

Essay assignment of approximately 10 pages (3,500 - 4,000 words), which students are given one week to write.

 

The exam will be assessed on an A-F grades scale. Grades are A-E for passed and F for failed.

Retake is offered in in the beginning of the following semester in cases of grade F or Fail. Deferred examination is offered in the beginning of the following semester if the student is unable to take the final exam due to illness or other exceptional circumstances. Registration deadline for retake is January 15 for autumn semester exams and August 15 for spring semester exams.

Date for examination

Approved project hand out date 05.06.2020 hand in date 12.06.2020

The date for the exam can be changed. The final date will be announced in the StudentWeb early in May and early in November.

Schedule



Kontakt
Rune Karlsen

Karlsen, Rune


Førstekonsulent
Telefon: +4777620969 rune.karlsen@uit.no

HSL-ISS-Lena-Bogstrand-512x640-.jpg

Lena Cecilie Bogstrand


Rådgiver
Telefon: +4777645269 lena.bogstrand@uit.no

Arild Buanes


Førsteamanuensis
Telefon: +4777620965 arild.buanes@uit.no