Play as a Therapeutic Tool in Pediatric Physical Therapy

The ability to play is fundamental to human existence and provides children with valuable, empowering experiences to learn about themselves and their environment. The need to integrate sensory-motor play as part of physical therapy intervention is widely accepted. However, little is known about the ways physical therapist (PT)s do this in clinical practice.

The ability to play is fundamental to human existence and provides children with valuable, empowering experiences to learn about themselves and their environment (1). The need to integrate sensory-motor play as part of physical therapy intervention is widely accepted (2-4). However, little is known about the ways physical therapist (PT)s do this in clinical practice (5, 6). In this study, we want to investigate PTs’ merging of sensory-motor play and therapy in their work with children up until three years. We aim to identify how sensory-motor play becomes part of PTs’ therapeutic strategy and to gain insight into the PTs’ own knowledge and experiences with using play as a therapeutic tool. The overarching research question is:

How do PTs understand, integrate and use sensory-motor play in their work with children aged 0-3 years and their caregivers?

By identifying the successful merging of sensory-motor play and therapy we will renew PTs’ toolbox of how to provide children with high dosages of variable, motivated sensory-motor play experiences that promote learning and development. Thus, the outcomes are relevant for children and families who receive early physical therapy intervention and for pediatric PTs in clinical practice.

Data will be collected through observation and video-recording of physical therapy sessions with children 0-3 years, and by conducting video-elicited in-depth interviews with PTs. The research study will be conducted in Norwegian municipalities and in two states in the USA. The study will be conducted in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki, we will protect the study participants’ integrity and ensure their anonymity throughout the study. The study design includes user involvement through all stages of the study and will be conducted by a collaborative research network:

Ragnhild B. Håkstad PT, PhD, Postdoc at UiT, daily manager of the project.

Gunn Kristin Øberg, PT, PhD, Professor at the Master Program in Neurological Physiotherapy UiT, project leader.

Catharina Elisabeth Arfwedson Wang, Professor in Clinical Psychology at the UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Specialist in Clinical Neuropsychology, Director of Clinical Research Group at the Department of Psychology, UiT.

Gay Lina Girolami PT, PhD, Clinical Professor and Director of Professional Education in the Department of Physical Therapy, University of Illinois at Chicago, USA.

Stacey Dusing PT, PhD, PCS, board certified pediatric PT, Associate Professor in the Department of Physical Therapy at the Virginia Commonwealth University, USA.

Hanne De Jaegher DPhil, philosopher of mind and of cognitive science, Ramón y Cajal research fellow at the University of the Basque Country, Spain.

User representatives are Tor Ketil Hågland and Line Lyngedal (PTs), Grete S. Åsvang and Jill Hege Solstrand (parents).

 

References:

1.         Henricks T. Play as experience. American Journal of Play. 2015;8(1).

2.         Campbell SK, Palisano RJ, Orlin MN. Physical therapy for children. 4th ed. St. Louis:
            Elsevier Saunders; 2012.

3.         Shepherd RB. Cerebral Palsy in Infancy: targeted activity to optimize early growth
            and development. London: Elsevier Health Sciences UK; 2013.

4.         Levitt S. Treatment of cerebral palsy and motor delay. 5th ed: Wiley-Blackwell; 2010.

5.         Lifter K, Mason EJ, Barton EE. Children’s play: Where we have been and where we
            could go. Journal of Early Intervention. 2011;33(4):281-97.

6.         Håkstad RB, Obstfelder A, Øberg GK. Let’s play! An observational study of primary
            care physical therapy with preterm infants aged 3–14 months. Infant Behavior and
             Development. 2017;46:115-23.


Ansvarlig for prosjektet: Ragnhild B. Håkstad